Updates: June 10, 2016

June 10, 2016 at 10:55 am (Art, Java, memory palace, Programming, Rant, Thinking) (, , , , , , , , , , , , )


I’ve been working on a number of different things as well as thinking about my next steps and goals for the year. Here is a point-form list of some of the projects and endeavors I’ve been spending effort on in the past couple weeks:

  • I set up a home Linux server. I wanted a local, private Git repository as well as a machine to host some automated processes and apps. Things have been working out very well on this front. It’s been a great learning experience on top of it as well as I haven’t really used Linux in a decade or more. I installed a desktop version of Ubuntu, but I’ve been sticking to using the terminal as much as possible to expand my sphere of knowledge.
  • I’ve been working on my coding skills and algorithm knowledge. I always have some sort of coding project on the go, but recently I’ve been so focused on my front-end skills that I’ve let my core skills droop a bit. To get back up to par, I’ve been solving a lot of coding problems in Java as well as figuring out some algorithms that I haven’t touched in a while. I decided to start basic with heaps and heapsort, then moved on to KMP string matching, and now I am working on suffix tries/trees. I’m going at a slow pace with this though so I can not only code solutions, but also store them in my mind palace.

   Preparing an algorithm for long-term mind palace storage pretty much consists of tearing the algorithm down to its basic elements in your mind and trying to make a story out of it. For example, I’ve decided to store the KMP string matching algorithm in a kitchen in one of my mind-rooms, so I compared the process to making spaghetti. Comparing noodles of different length was the basis of the story. I also had to work in the generation of the prefix table for the search pattern. For this, I’ve been toying around with adding some sort of “sauce” to the story to indicate the comparisons of the prefix to suffix for each length of the pattern noodle.

   I think that I’m finally starting to outgrow the hub room I’ve been using for my computer science mind palace. It was a good index for classes of algorithms so I could always see what tools were at my disposal, but it’s getting too cluttered now.

  • I’ve also been doing a lot of general-purpose reading. I visited the library not long ago and “accidentally” walked away with between 10-15 books. Some of these were painting-related so I could learn some new techniques and composition skills, but I also picked up some interesting biology books. One of these is a book on viruses (the non-computer version). I’ve been learning a lot about how they operate as well as how they’re being used/manipulated today. Bacteriophages are being produced to one day replace antibiotics, and I find the whole thing fascinating (phages are a type of virus that goes after bacteria instead of humans).
  • In addition to practicing my coding/problem solving skills, I’ve also been working on learning and using some new technologies; at least new to me. I’ve been fiddling with the Play framework, which is a web platform. I wasn’t really impressed with it at the start as you have to use a self-hosted web app just to create a project structure, but beyond that it seems really nifty. My next area of interest within this framework is the Ebean integration, which allows for a fun way to connect objects to databases without having to write scripts and stored procedures. There are also some features to allow syncing a database to ElasticSearch automatically, which will be fun.
  • The Android platform is another area I am learning about lately. I’ve set up my development environment and I’ve been learning about the SDK for creating apps. It seems like there are a lot of different approaches to building Android apps, especially as the SDK has been evolving. It has made things a little awkward to get started (as there are many references on the internet to doing things the “old” ways), but I think I’m past that hurdle now. My only real problem now is that I haven’t been spending enough time on this project.
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Updates: May 2016

May 15, 2016 at 7:03 pm (Computer Science, Java, memory palace, Programming, Rant, Thinking) (, , , , , , , )


It’s been a while since I’ve posted about my recent endeavors outside of painting (this is by design). There’s been a fair amount of things keeping me busy and stressed. That being said, I’ve started putting together and working on my goals for the next several months. A large part of this will be getting my full-stack technical skills back up to a competitive level. I’m going to be focusing mostly on my Java skills as well as commonly-used libraries, since it’s been a while.

As part of this, I spent a bit of time building a small app to back up my development files. Mostly because I needed a good, automated process and didn’t want to go shopping for an app. I needed something that can backup different sets of files at different times, so I could selectively backup specific projects and images, but also my full dev repository. It seems to be working according to my tests, but I’ll be trying it out soon to find out.

I also plan on picking up Python. I think I will use Python 3, although I want to be knowledgeable of the differences from 2 to 3 as well so I can read/port existing code. It shouldn’t take long to pick it up, but I have to learn the specific syntax and rules such as scoping, etc. Some sort of project would help, so I’ll be trying to think of more home automation tasks I could fulfill with Python apps.

Lastly (for this post), I plan on giving my memory palace an upgrade. I need some more rooms, and I need to finish storing algorithms in it. I’m missing tree and graph algorithms (which are pretty important), and I wouldn’t mind adding some more details for implementation as well. This should ensure that I don’t have to review algorithms, data structures, and design patterns when I need to use them; I’ll have them permanently stored.

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Improve Your Memory and Never Forget

September 28, 2015 at 2:27 pm (Rant, Thinking, Uncategorized) (, , , , , , )


Memory is key to living. How can you operate if you can’t remember who you are, what you’re doing, and where you’re going? Consider this quotation from Hugh of St. Victor: “The whole usefulness of education consists only in the memory of it”. Essentially, you could pay thousands of dollars to go to school for years and obtain a doctorate, but how useful is it if you don’t remember anything of those years?

Often I hear people explain that their memory isn’t what it used to be, and they just can’t seem to retain anything. Unfortunately, there is no magic cure to help us instantly improve our memories and remember everything we’d like to. However, I’d like to introduce you to a technique I make use of: the memory palace. Honestly, you don’t have to be a genius or a brilliant detective to take advantage of this technique, but it will take some deliberate practice and effort to get used to it.

Brief Background on Memory Palaces

This technique is also known as the “Method of Loci”, the “Journey Method”, or the “Roman Room” method. All of these names essentially point to the idea of associating items or concepts with a physical location. You might not even realize this, but your brain is exceedingly good at remembering locations. You’re able to remember the rooms in your house, where your furniture is, and where the bathroom is at your place of employment. I bet you can probably remember the journey you took to get to work today as well.

The general idea of this technique is that you associate the things you want to memorize with areas of these locations using vivid images. When you imagine yourself walking through your location in your mind, you will “see” these images and they will remind you of the items you’re trying to remember.

See the Memory Palace in Action

As a trivial example to illustrate my point, if I wanted to remember a grocery list consisting of bread, milk, eggs, and butter, I could do something like the following:

I choose to use the journey from my apartment to the nearest bus stop; I live pretty close to it, but my list is very small. As I exit the lobby of my apartment, my spider-sense tingles to let me know I’m in danger! I quickly duck to avoid being hit by a French baker swinging a baguette at me. He shouts profanities at me as I run around the corner to avoid him. Whew! Bread is the first item on my list.

As the next part of my journey, I have to cross over the exit to the underground parking lot for my building. Unfortunately, just as I walk up to it, a stampede of cows rush out of the parking lot. Their cow bells are clanging as they run past me, and I notice that they definitely smell like cows. Milk is the second item on my list.

Once the stampede is over, I continue down the street to a stop sign so I can cross the road. I wait to ensure the cars are going to stop for me before I begin to cross. As I start to walk, I hear honking from the jeep that stopped for me – what is their problem? I look over and there are chickens driving that jeep! They look really angry with me that I had the nerve to cross the road and they start throwing eggs at me. I cover my head and run to get to the other side. Eggs are the third item.

It finally looks like I’ve made it; I can see the bus stop from here. As I fist-bump the air to celebrate, I realize I’ve made a grave mistake – I’m no longer watching the sidewalk. Somebody has smeared butter all over the sidewalk and I slip and fall! Now I’m covered in grease and everything will probably stick to me now. Butter is the last item on the list.

At this point, you need to practice walking through this journey in your mind. If you only need the list for a short period of time, you don’t need to practice that much. However, if you are storing information you’ll need for a long period of time, you’ll want to refresh the journey periodically to make sure it doesn’t degrade.

What Can You Store in a Memory Palace?

Honestly, I haven’t been able to find things that can’t be memorized using this technique. It has been used for hundreds of years by some very famous people (as a homework assignment, I encourage you to do a little research). Essentially anything can be stored, but it depends on the amount of effort and creativity you have. Here is a short list of different types of information you can store; everybody likes lists, right?

  • Sequential Lists of data such as processes, instructions, or ordered data
  • Sets of unrelated data such as concepts within a field or shopping lists
  • Speeches or stories. These have an ordered sequence of plot points

Ways to Improve the Quality of these Associations

On a final note, I should discuss some things to make the whole process easier. There are certain types of memories that your brain will have an easier time storing. If you think of images for your memory palace that involve these concepts, you’ll find that they will become more vivid and therefore more memorable. The following is a short (but not exclusive) list of these concepts:

Laughter. Create funny images that you can laugh at. Instead of some ultra-realistic image, throw in some comical things like chickens throwing their eggs at somebody.

Exaggeration. Make things larger than they have to be or more intense. An angry French baker dueling with bread is more memorable than a grocery store rack of bread loafs (to me anyway).

Your senses. Memories that include multiple senses have a lasting effect. What do things smell like? What do they sound like? Do they have tactile textures?

Positive Thinking. This is an underestimated factor of memory. You have to have a positive opinion of what you’re trying to remember. Your subconscious will always try to protect you by trimming out unhappy memories when it can. Keeping things positive will put you in a better state when you revisit your memory palace and will reduce stress (which creates chemicals that are not helpful for thinking).

I hope you’ll give this a shot; I’ve had some great success using this technique to remember some really tedious and detail-oriented concepts over the years. It’s great for never forgetting, and it’s also an excellent creativity exercise. Happy remembering.

Originally posted here: http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/improve-your-memory-never-forget-jake-seigel

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Convince your Brain to Inspire you with a Memory Palace

September 10, 2015 at 11:22 am (Innovation, Rant, Teaching, Thinking) (, , , , )


If you haven’t heard yet, memory palace techniques are amazing ways to store vast amounts of information in your brain! It has even made its way into popular culture through the BBC show Sherlock and the CBS show Elementary, although the good news is that it’s accessible enough that you can use it without being Sherlock Holmes.

The basic idea of it is that your brain is really great at remembering places; just think about how well you know your own house, your place of work, and the routes to get from one to the other. The trick is that you associate images of things you’d like to remember with difference areas of these locations or routes. The technique is known as the “Method of Loci” and has been used for centuries, although I won’t bore you with the details right now.

I highly encourage you to try out the “Method of Loci” when you get some time, but I’d like to share a specific version of this technique that I make use of every day; I call it the “inspiration room”. You know how some things can get you fired up with ideas? Have you ever walked out of a movie and thought to yourself “wow, that really got me fired up about that concept”? If you have no idea what I’m talking about, I probably sound foolish, but you should probably find more things in this world that interest you.

Anyway, I’ve built up a room in my “memory palace” where I store all of these images that inspire me and make me feel creative. Whenever I need to come up with an original idea or I need to get into a mindset to be creative, I just imagine myself walking around this place and looking at all of the interesting things in this room. It makes sure that I will never forget the things that inspire me and that I can recall them whenever I need to.

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about in case what I’m talking about makes no sense. I begin by thinking about a specific building that I’ve worked in at one point in my life. I’ve spent a lot of time in this building, so I know the hallways and rooms pretty well. I know what the cubicle walls feel like and how sound seems to get absorbed by them. Essentially in my memory I’ve made this place very real by remembering the smells, the sounds, and the feel of things.

So I walk through the hallways of this building, and look in each room; the rooms are where I store my inspiring memories. For example, in one of my rooms I store a scene from the film Iron Man. There is a scene where the main character is building out an upgraded version of his suit of armour that can fly, and he is assisted by his computerized assistant J.A.R.V.I.S. When I first saw this movie, I stayed up until 4am attempting to build my own version of his AI assistant so I could have him organize my life. My memory from that movie and my experiences are something that help me to stay focused and productive. I store Tony Stark in one of the rooms in my mind so I can watch him work productively on his armour.

In case you were curious, I actually did build a basic version of an AI assistant that used natural language processing to activate various tasks. It was fairly successful, but I eventually abandoned the project a couple weeks later. Now it seems that AI assistants are all the rage… whoops…

Hopefully by now I’ve sold you on how useful this idea is. It’s something that I use to stay productive with my time and to get rid of those “blah” feelings when I’m tired. The actual technique of building up this type of room is actually pretty straightforward. First, write down the images that inspire you; you need to know what you’re building before you start. Then pick a location that you know very well. It should be fairly large so you can add new images later on, but it needs to have memorable features such as windows, furniture, or colours.

The last step is probably the hardest one: you have to practice walking through this location in your mind. You have to vividly remember the location and as you walk through it, you need to connect rooms or features with your images by imagining they are there. These instructions may sound a little vague, but your brain actually knows how to do this for you. It just needs to be programmed, and you do this by repeatedly walking through the room and looking at the images.

I hope to tell you about other mental techniques I use on a regular basis in the future. These are really useful for so many aspects of life, and don’t require that much effort to use. Let me know what you think about these or if you have any questions about the technique. I spend a lot of my time practicing these techniques and reading about how others do similar things.

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Synesthesia + PAO Memory Technique

June 10, 2015 at 9:12 am (Thinking, Uncategorized) (, , , , , )


Some of the books I’ve been reading lately are about the use of advanced memory techniques such as the memory palace or the person-action-object method. It’s actually interesting that I’ve read so much on the subject that I keep reading references to the existing material; this means that I’ve found the “good” stuff.

I’ve been experimenting with the memory palace technique for a while, but I started trying out the PAO method. The interesting bit here is that I have synesthesia: a condition where my brain merges different things together essentially. In my case, when I look at or think about numbers or letters, I see colours as well. These colours are always associated with the same digits and it never changes. On an unusual side note, I also have the same effect with personalities (it’s hard to explain).

Anyway, I’m still in the preliminary stage, but I’m associating Marvel characters with numbers based on their costume colour palette. Essentially, each character has one or two colours that are fairly iconic for them. For example, Iron Man is red and yellow and Spiderman is blue and red. I’m hoping to use this as a starting point for using this system (definitely check out how it works on wikipedia).

For those interested, the colours I associate with numbers don’t change, but they’re kind of hard for me to describe or even pick out from a list. I’ve put together an image showing a loose approximation of the 0-9 numbers:

Synesthesia

Synesthesia

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Update Mar 12, 2015: New game demo, mind palaces, and notebooks

March 12, 2015 at 1:29 pm (Game Development, Games, Processing, Thinking) (, , , , , , , , )


It’s been a while again since I’ve posted here, but I haven’t been idle in this period of time. I don’t think I can list all of the things I’ve been up to, but here are three things I’ve been up to:

New Game Demo

I’ve recently released (privately) a new demo for my game. It features brand new levels, mechanics, and storyline. I’ve even added new tilesets and original music for the levels. With the last demo, I was happy to have something playable that resembled a game and showed off some of the neat things I’ve built, but this time I think I’m actually content with it as a game. I’ve added some dialogue that needs a bit of polishing, but is roughly what I want it to be as well. I still need to post screenshots and a video, but I need a big chunk of time to do that still.

The first person to play-test it and give feedback made me pretty happy. It seems that they felt what I wanted them to feel and thought what I wanted them to think with respect to the storyline. They noticed some of the extra details I put into the levels (like the rain effect) as well. One thing I took away though, was that they didn’t use the camera mechanic at all. I think I might add some HUD cues and mechanics to encourage the usage of it.

 Mind Palace

I’ve been spending a considerable amount of time lately rebuilding my “Mind Palace”. This is a mental tool that utilizes the “Method of Loci” method for memorization. Essentially it’s a superior way to reliably remember things. It takes a bit of effort to set up and upkeep, but if done correctly, you can do wonderful things with it.

Before, I was building the hub structure of my palace based on something I had imagined. My problem was that I never fully constructed it; I wasn’t sure how big of a space I needed, so it deteriorated over time faster. I can still reference most of the rooms, but I didn’t solidify where everything was enough.

Also, I didn’t have enough connections to well-known places. Examples of these are houses I’ve previous lived in, These are useful as you can typically just imagine yourself moving through those places and then have your memories jump out at you. My next goal is to tie in more of those to my “hub area” so that I can jump from location to location without having to remember how many houses I’ve lived in. It probably would look like that hallway in one of the Matrix sequels that had all the doors leading to difference places.

 Notebooks

Soooo, it turns out I am a crazy person? I used to have decision issues when it would come to notebooks. I remember being in a store for 10 minutes trying to decide what colour I wanted to use for a notebook. I ended up just buying all of them so that I could decide in a non-public place. Recently, Target has gone out of business in Canada due to questionable decision making. The good part of this is that Moleskine notebooks have gone on sale; at the time I purchased them, the discount was 30% off. I rarely notice these going on sale, and since I’ve started using them almost exclusively, it seemed like a great idea! However, now I have a drawer full of different sizes of notebooks and my mind will only let me use certain notebooks for certain purposes. I’m happy to not have to go buy more for a while, but now I have to store a ton of notebooks…

 

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Book of Knowledge

August 18, 2014 at 10:58 am (Rant, Teaching, Thinking) (, , , , , )


I am starting a new notebook. While reviewing some information from one of the online courses I’m taking right now, I realized that I am back in an old habit of assuming I’m smarter than I am. This usually means that I read stuff and learn about stuff and assume I’ll just remember it, or assume that I understand it completely. This notebook is meant to write down summarized information on whatever I am learning at the time. It will also include mnemonic tips and other stuff.

This will allow me to quickly review whatever is in the book and solidify it in my mind. I want to keep it concise enough so I can glance through it, but have enough details so that I don’t lose context or have no clue what things are.

Work in progress.

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