Zombie Mansion: Screenshot

November 17, 2013 at 9:55 pm (Computer Science, Games, Processing, Video games) (, , , , , , )


November 2013 Screenshot

November 2013 Screenshot

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Paper Donkey Engine: Zombie Mansion Screenshots

February 17, 2013 at 5:17 pm (Computer Science, Games, Graphics, Processing, Programming) (, , , , , , , , )


So I’ve started building an action-adventure-horror game using the new upgrades to the Paper Donkey Engine. If you’ve been following along, I’ve added a physics engine and many other nice features that would support an action game that’s rendered in a 2D-in-3D style using billboards. This weekend I made good use of the built-in scripting engine to make a weapons HUD, shooting, item pick-ups, and a bunch of other things. I’ve added a zombie enemy type that slowly chases the player to try to attack them. The player has a 6-shot revolver to battle the zombies right now and there’s a wide selection of sound effects in the game. Walls and objects can have custom materials assigned so bullet impacts¬†make different noises.

On a minor note, I’ve started making more character art so I can build up a demo that’s a bit more interesting to see. Right now I have 4 directions for the player character and I’m working on walking animations and additional weapons. I have some neat ideas for the game demo that I’m excited to put in as well (storyline and dialogue, etc).

Here’s some new screenshots:

Feb16_2013_A

Room with a movable crate and a zombie to attack the player

Feb17_2013_A

First room in the game demo

Second room in the demo

Second room in the demo

 

Second room in the demo  with the camera rotated

Second room in the demo with the camera rotated

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Paper Donkey Game Engine Screenshot update

February 15, 2013 at 9:05 am (Computer Science, Games, Graphics, Processing, Programming) (, , , , , , , , )


So here’s a screenshot I took this morning before leaving for work (I’ll try to get a bigger set of them this weekend). It shows some of the new features, although not all of them are obvious. The biggest new features is the walls that only face forward. This means that you can only see the back walls of the room, and the front ones disappear automatically depending on the camera view. If you rotate the camera around then the scene will fix itself to this effect.

The next feature (which technically isn’t displayed here) is the addition of an NPC system. The second character in the scene is an NPC that you can walk up to and initiate a chat dialogue with. This dialogue system is powered by flexible scripted chat files.

Feb15_2013_A

My next moves will probably be to add AI logic to the NPCs so I can create enemies. I will most likely also import the particle effects I had created for my turn-based game and let the level scripts control them.

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Paper Donkey Engine (Feb 2013): Screenshot

February 11, 2013 at 7:42 pm (Computer Science, Games, Graphics, Processing, Programming) (, , , , , , , )


I’ve taken a more recent screenshot of what my game engine can do now. I wrote some code to apply it to an adventure type game where you move from room to room and interact with stuff. It uses Box2D for physics and the Rhino-based Javascript engine from Java for the scripting engine. The blue lines in the screenshot represent the doorways; if you want into them, the level changes to a different room. You can push the crates around and they slide like you’d expect them to (and in this demo, you can click to make a massive number of them). It has the same auto-rotate feature as in my other tech demo/game-in-progress as well. This lets you spin the camera around the focal point by 90 degrees to let you see the level from a different point of view. It’s probably more impressive to see it than to read about it.

 

Feb11_2013_A

 

Next on the to-do list is to add a better input control system. I have some code that will allow players to use XBox 360 controllers as input for this, which should be really neat.

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Tactical Game Engine Improvements!

August 2, 2012 at 3:38 pm (Computer Science, Games, Graphics, Processing, Programming) (, , , , , , , , , , , )


So in my spare time (I have a real-person job at a software company now), I’ve been working on that game I mentioned in a previous post. It’s a tactical/strategy game where you give orders to a team of units and do battle with AI-controlled enemies. The proof of concept demo was in working shape, but it was super ugly and only supported 2D stuff. So while I could test out levels and combat features, I wouldn’t be able to show it to people and expect good feedback.

So I set out to make a visually-appealing version of the software so that A) I’d have a platform to plug in new gameplay ideas and features and B) I could show it to people and have them think it was an actual game. My ultimate goal in the end is having a full game (including story, music, and art) that I can release to the general public and have them play.¬†So after a bit of work on evenings and weekends, I now have it in the following status (also, I should note that this was all written in Java and Processing (p5):

-3D rendering. Similar to how some of my previous projects work; I’m doing 2D sprites rendered in 3D. This allows the user to rotate the camera around the map and have it work in the way they’d expect. I have to finish up the render pipeline details, but most of this is copy and paste from a previous project anyway.

-Working gameplay. Most of these components were copy and pasted from the previous iteration. However, I’ve made substantial upgrades to how the system works. Also, now the game events are handled in a way that allows the game to flow similar to a real game of the same type. For example, when the AI makes a move, it no longer moves everything at once and then starts the player’s next turn. Instead it shows the player each action it took (while allowing the player to skip ahead).

-Level Editor. I’ve added a built-in level editor and it not only has a whole whack of features, but also is designed in a way that allows new tools to be added easily.

 

Future features:

-Particle system. Allows explosions and powers to look nice.

-Camera cutscene paths. I have some code written for Catmull-Rom curves that would allow the camera to slide along a path created in the level editor.

-Player profile system. Allows a player to select a profile on their system so that multiple players can play the same game without overwriting saves.

-Character customization screens. I want to have an extensive menu system to allow character stat tweaking, etc. between battles. This is mostly game design/art stuff, but the GUI code might need more features.

-Game story! I have a fair bit written up for the story and characters, but I need to iron out plenty more of it. I also have to figure out if I’m going to go with episodes that are easier to write for and make (also in case nobody likes the game, I can save resources).

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Paper Donkey Engine

February 3, 2011 at 1:32 pm (Computer Science, Games, Graphics) (, , , , , , , , , )


So I haven’t posted in a very long time now, mostly due to me being busy with research and life. I have a few projects I want to post some stuff about though. One of them is the SpeedGame I created last September for a competition. It’s codenamed Paper Donkey and is essentially a 2D-in-3D engine I wrote in Processing. I had a teammate (Matt) for this project and so I made him do most of the game design and level creation aspect of it so that I could focus on engine coding. We didn’t really care about winning anything, but mostly just wanted the experience of working on a team to make a completed project.

The game we came up with itself was a little on the dull side. Due to time constraints, we had to trim the game mechanics to just a maze. That being said, I would consider it a huge success. I only really wanted to build an engine I could use to prototype games and I got what I wanted. The engine code is pretty nifty and it works great. There is a slight performance issue though since I do some pretty naive collision detection and other things like that. Also, a couple of the features ended up being really glitchy so I removed them from the levels.

The engine renders 2D sprites in a 3D perspective. So the level geometry is represented by floor and wall tiles while the characters are rendered as billboards that always face the camera. It has a pretty decent animation system, but no editor so the files have to be created by hand to specify animation sequences. The same goes for the levels because I didn’t bother to use my old map editor formats for this project. It has been a while since I’ve worked with the engine, so I’ll have to take a look at it in order to post more on the exact features of it, but it was a blast to make and use. It took about a week to build and a week to make the game on top of it.

<I will edit this post at a later time and add screenshots>

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