Convince your Brain to Inspire you with a Memory Palace

September 10, 2015 at 11:22 am (Innovation, Rant, Teaching, Thinking) (, , , , )


If you haven’t heard yet, memory palace techniques are amazing ways to store vast amounts of information in your brain! It has even made its way into popular culture through the BBC show Sherlock and the CBS show Elementary, although the good news is that it’s accessible enough that you can use it without being Sherlock Holmes.

The basic idea of it is that your brain is really great at remembering places; just think about how well you know your own house, your place of work, and the routes to get from one to the other. The trick is that you associate images of things you’d like to remember with difference areas of these locations or routes. The technique is known as the “Method of Loci” and has been used for centuries, although I won’t bore you with the details right now.

I highly encourage you to try out the “Method of Loci” when you get some time, but I’d like to share a specific version of this technique that I make use of every day; I call it the “inspiration room”. You know how some things can get you fired up with ideas? Have you ever walked out of a movie and thought to yourself “wow, that really got me fired up about that concept”? If you have no idea what I’m talking about, I probably sound foolish, but you should probably find more things in this world that interest you.

Anyway, I’ve built up a room in my “memory palace” where I store all of these images that inspire me and make me feel creative. Whenever I need to come up with an original idea or I need to get into a mindset to be creative, I just imagine myself walking around this place and looking at all of the interesting things in this room. It makes sure that I will never forget the things that inspire me and that I can recall them whenever I need to.

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about in case what I’m talking about makes no sense. I begin by thinking about a specific building that I’ve worked in at one point in my life. I’ve spent a lot of time in this building, so I know the hallways and rooms pretty well. I know what the cubicle walls feel like and how sound seems to get absorbed by them. Essentially in my memory I’ve made this place very real by remembering the smells, the sounds, and the feel of things.

So I walk through the hallways of this building, and look in each room; the rooms are where I store my inspiring memories. For example, in one of my rooms I store a scene from the film Iron Man. There is a scene where the main character is building out an upgraded version of his suit of armour that can fly, and he is assisted by his computerized assistant J.A.R.V.I.S. When I first saw this movie, I stayed up until 4am attempting to build my own version of his AI assistant so I could have him organize my life. My memory from that movie and my experiences are something that help me to stay focused and productive. I store Tony Stark in one of the rooms in my mind so I can watch him work productively on his armour.

In case you were curious, I actually did build a basic version of an AI assistant that used natural language processing to activate various tasks. It was fairly successful, but I eventually abandoned the project a couple weeks later. Now it seems that AI assistants are all the rage… whoops…

Hopefully by now I’ve sold you on how useful this idea is. It’s something that I use to stay productive with my time and to get rid of those “blah” feelings when I’m tired. The actual technique of building up this type of room is actually pretty straightforward. First, write down the images that inspire you; you need to know what you’re building before you start. Then pick a location that you know very well. It should be fairly large so you can add new images later on, but it needs to have memorable features such as windows, furniture, or colours.

The last step is probably the hardest one: you have to practice walking through this location in your mind. You have to vividly remember the location and as you walk through it, you need to connect rooms or features with your images by imagining they are there. These instructions may sound a little vague, but your brain actually knows how to do this for you. It just needs to be programmed, and you do this by repeatedly walking through the room and looking at the images.

I hope to tell you about other mental techniques I use on a regular basis in the future. These are really useful for so many aspects of life, and don’t require that much effort to use. Let me know what you think about these or if you have any questions about the technique. I spend a lot of my time practicing these techniques and reading about how others do similar things.

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